recycle week

Recycle Week confirmed for autumn 2017

WRAP has confirmed that Recycle Week will return in 2017, taking place from 25 September until 1 October.

Now in its 14th year, the Recycle Now and WRAP-coordinated week has become a mainstay of the local authority and waste industry calendar, with a range of communications and activities organised to encourage householders to recycle.

While the theme of the week has yet to be decided, previous years have focused on boosting the recycling of everyday household items such as plastics, cans and waste and electronic equipment (WEEE).

In 2016, Recycle Week targeted ‘The Unusual Suspects’ – items which are often forgotten by householders such as shampoo bottles from the bathroom (see letsrecycle.com story).

The ‘National Recycling Week’ in its current form was first launched by WRAP in 2004, and was backed by a number of reprocessing associations including British Glass, Alupro, Corus, the Paper Federation and Recoup.

Previous recycling-themed weeks had been held over the past 30 years in the UK, with the first one established in 1987. Held in mid-October, efforts to encourage householders to recycle in 1987 were overshadowed in south east England by the now infamous hurricane.

Former London Mayor Ken Livingstone took part in promotional work in the capital to tie in with the first WRAP-backed Recycle Week in 2004

Over the last 14 years the WRAP backed Recycle Now scheme has been held on different weeks. For many years the event was held in June – but WRAP reverted back to a September scheduling in 2016 so as not to clash with the UK referendum on membership of the EU.

Commenting on the 2017 event, Recycle Now noted:

“As in previous years Recycle Now will look to provide you with lots of digital content for you to use and depending on the theme we may produce printed material to enable you to get involved as much as you can.

“As last year we will be sending out regular information about Recycle Week and other Recycle Now activity via e shots and e newsletters.”

References:

Let’s Recycle

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