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Anaerobic Digestion & Renewable Energy Industries Welcome UK Carbon Budget Decision

The UK government has confirmed the Committee on Carbon Change’s recommended carbon budget, laying out a 57% reduction in carbon emissions from 1990 levels during 2027-32.

Following the referendum vote to leave the European Union, the UK government has confirmed the Committee on Carbon Change’s (CCCs) recommended carbon budget, laying out a 57% reduction in carbon emissions from 1990 levels during 2027-32.

The decision has been welcomed by both the Anaerobic Digestion & Bioresources Association (ADBA) and the Renewable Energy Association (REA).

According to ADBA the ratcheting up of carbon reduction targets now needs to be met with ambitious and concrete plans to reach these emissions reductions.

The organisation said that, as the CCC advised, the government should introduce consistent food waste collection services throughout England, and anaerobic digestion must be encouraged to support manure and waste management on farms, helping reduce agricultural emissions and supporting strong farming businesses.

ADBA’s Chief Executive, Charlotte Morton, said:

“The AD industry’s continued growth has been put at risk by changes to support mechanisms like the Feed-in Tariff, but the government can reassure the sector and deliver its goals by setting out a clear vision for both food waste collections and farm-based AD.”

This is a sentiment echoed by the REA, which said that the decision gives the renewables industry and investors more long-term confidence, but cautioned that the decision will need to be backed up by supportive policies that will unlock finance in much needed new energy infrastructure. 

James Court, Head of Policy and External affairs at the REA, urged:

“This would be the worst time for the government to row back or U-turn on existing commitments, which would be toxic to inward investors. So this is a positive first step, but will need to be backed up by a robust energy plan by the end of the year.”

“The referendum has been a shock to economy, yet we still have a looming energy gap. Renewables will be easier to finance than larger centralised projects, will give the UK energy security and price stability, as well as boost new technology jobs and inward investment.,” he concluded.

References:

Waste Management World

Anaerobic Digestion & Bioresources Association

Renewable Energy Association

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